reform


reform
{{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}}
noun
ADJECTIVE
dramatic, drastic, fundamental, great, important, major, radical, significant, substantial
broad, comprehensive, far-reaching, sweeping, wholesale, wide-ranging

The Prime Minister promised sweeping reforms of the banking system.

genuine, meaningful, real
minor, modest
piecemeal
new
proposed
further
immediate
rapid
lasting
necessary, needed, overdue

much-needed reforms

Health-care reform is long overdue.

effective
practical
moral, political, social
democratic, liberal
domestic, institutional, internal
procedural, structural

There remains reluctance to undertake the structural reforms advocated by Mr Smith.

administrative, governmental, regulatory
policy
constitutional, election, electoral, judicial, law, legal, legislative, tort (esp. AmE)

The country desperately needs broad political and constitutional reform.

intelligence

our debate on intelligence reform

penal, prison
curriculum, education, educational, school
health-care, pension, social-security, welfare

advocates of health-care reform

banking, economic, finance, financial, fiscal, market, monetary, tax

The government instituted a tax reform to stimulate demand.

corporate, media

the battle for corporate reform

agrarian, agricultural, environmental, land
immigration

Top on his list was immigration reform.

… OF REFORMS
package
VERB + REFORM
adopt, bring about, initiate, introduce, pass
push through

They wanted to push through radical reforms.

carry out, enact, implement, institute, make, put in place, put into practice, undertake

His administration carried out economic reforms.

accelerate

efforts to accelerate the structural reform of the economy

delay
block

The conservative coalition could delay further reforms or block them altogether.

oppose, resist
accept, embrace, welcome
advocate, call for, press for, promote, propose, pursue, push for, seek

They have issued a statement advocating reform of the legal system.

Publishers continue to push for sweeping reforms.

demand
back, encourage, support

We are committed to supporting democracy and reform in the region.

require

The practice of global politics requires reform.

plan
discuss
REFORM + VERB
go through

The reforms went through in spite of opposition from teachers.

be aimed at sth

tax reforms aimed at encouraging land development

fail

His economic reforms failed to improve their lives.

REFORM + NOUN
process
movement
agenda, initiative, package, plan, programme/program, proposal
measure, policy
act, bill, law, legislation

The House narrowly passed the education reform bill.

school (esp. AmE)
PREPOSITION
reform in

reforms in housing and education

PHRASES
the need for reform
the pace of reform
a programme/program of reform
{{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}}
verb
ADVERB
drastically, fundamentally, radically, truly

The education system must be radically reformed.

the near impossibility of truly reforming the system

VERB + REFORM
attempt to, push to, seek to, try to
PHRASES
attempts to reform sth, efforts to reform sth, proposals to reform sth
a need to reform sth
Reform is used with these nouns as the object: ↑economy, ↑education, health service, ↑institution, ↑law, ↑military, ↑social security, ↑system

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Reform — Reform …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • reform — re·form /ri fȯrm/ vt 1: to put (a writing) into a corrected form that more accurately reflects the agreement of the parties allows a writing signed by mistake to be reform ed W. M. McGovern, Jr. et al. compare ratify 2: to induce or c …   Law dictionary

  • Reform — (lat. für re zurück; formatio: Gestaltung, Wiederherstellung) bezeichnet in der Politik eine größere, planvolle und gewaltlose Umgestaltung bestehender Verhältnisse und Systeme. Das Wort erscheint schon in den Paulus Briefen der Bibel, später… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Reform — Re*form , n. [F. r[ e]forme.] Amendment of what is defective, vicious, corrupt, or depraved; reformation; as, reform of elections; reform of government. [1913 Webster] {Civil service reform}. See under {Civil}. {Reform acts} (Eng. Politics), acts …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reform — Re*form (r?*f?rm ), v. t. [F. r[ e]former, L. reformare; pref. re re + formare to form, from forma form. See {Form}.] To put into a new and improved form or condition; to restore to a former good state, or bring from bad to good; to change from… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reform — Reform, AL U.S. city in Alabama Population (2000): 1978 Housing Units (2000): 925 Land area (2000): 8.042385 sq. miles (20.829681 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.028421 sq. miles (0.073611 sq. km) Total area (2000): 8.070806 sq. miles (20.903292 sq …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Reform, AL — U.S. city in Alabama Population (2000): 1978 Housing Units (2000): 925 Land area (2000): 8.042385 sq. miles (20.829681 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.028421 sq. miles (0.073611 sq. km) Total area (2000): 8.070806 sq. miles (20.903292 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Reform — Re*form , v. i. To return to a good state; to amend or correct one s own character or habits; as, a man of settled habits of vice will seldom reform. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reform. — reform. = reformiert. * * * reform. = reformiert …   Universal-Lexikon

  • reform — vb *correct, rectify, emend, amend, remedy, redress, revise Analogous words: *mend, repair, rebuild: better, *improve, help, ameliorate reform n *reformation …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • reform — The verb reform (with the stress on the second syllable) means ‘to improve by removing faults’. Re form (with hyphen) means ‘to form again’ …   Modern English usage