term


term
{{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}}
noun
1 word or group of words
ADJECTIVE
specific
blanket, broad, general, generic, umbrella
descriptive
common
basic, key
correct, preferred
precise
ambiguous, vague
mild, strong

His objection was couched in the strongest terms.

colloquial, slang
derogatory, pejorative

‘Nerd’ is a pejorative term for someone who likes computers.

technical
search

Try entering the search term ‘classical music’.

clinical, legal, medical, musical, etc.
VERB + TERM
use
be couched in
define, explain
coin, introduce, invent

The term ‘acid rain’ was coined in the 19th century.

borrow
prefer

I prefer the term ‘network’ to ‘community’.

apply

I think we can apply the term ‘genius’ to the painter.

TERM + VERB
connote sth, denote sth, describe sth, mean sth
apply to sth, be applied to sth, cover sth, refer to sth

The term ‘renewable energy’ is applied, for example, to energy deriving from solar radiation.

PREPOSITION
term for

‘Old man’ is a slang term for ‘father’.

term of

a term of abuse/endearment

PHRASES
in glowing terms

The chairman spoke of the achievements of the company in glowing terms.

in no uncertain terms

I let them know in no uncertain terms how disappointed I was.

in simple terms
in the following terms
2 in … terms showing what aspect of something you are considering
ADJECTIVE
absolute, material, practical, real

Income has increased in real terms by 5%.

relative

Iceland has had a mild winter, in relative terms.

broad, general
clear, concrete

The law should be set out in clear terms.

abstract
international
negative

She tends to perceive herself in purely negative terms.

cultural, economic, financial, historical, money, political, scientific, social, etc.

In money terms, the event was a disaster.

3 (usually terms) of an agreement/a relationship
ADJECTIVE
favourable/favorable, unfavourable/unfavorable
express, implied (both BrE, law)

the breach of an express term in the contract

contract, credit, peace
VERB + TERM
dictate, negotiate, set

Our opponents set the terms of the debate.

accept, agree on, agree to
violate
extend
PREPOSITION
under the terms of

Under the terms of the alliance, Japan was not obliged to enter the war.

PHRASES
on amicable terms, on friendly terms, on good terms

The dispute was resolved on amicable terms.

on equal terms

It is a sport in which the top men and women can compete on equal terms.

on familiar terms, on first-name terms

I'm on first-name terms with my boss.

on speaking terms

They haven't been on speaking terms since they had that big row.

terms and conditions

A wide range of accounts are available, with varying terms and conditions.

4 (esp. BrE) period of a school/university year ⇨ See also ↑semester
ADJECTIVE
college, school, university (BrE)
spring, summer, etc.
TERM + NOUN
paper (AmE)

I was working on a term paper for a geography class.

PREPOSITION
during (the) term

It's hard to get away during term.

in the term

We have exams in the summer term.

PHRASES
the beginning of (the) term, the end of (the) term

It's the end of term. (BrE)

It's the end of the term. (AmE)

5 period of time
ADJECTIVE
long, short

a long term of imprisonment

full (medical)

The pregnancy went to full term (= lasted the normal length of time).

fixed

The contract was for a fixed term of five years.

jail, prison
presidential
first, second

The president wants to make tax reform a top priority during his second term.

VERB + TERM
serve

He served a five-year prison term.

seek

She is now seeking her second term in the Senate.

win

Blair won a third term of office.

begin, complete
TERM + VERB
run

Her current term runs until January 2014.

expire, run out

His term expires at the end of May.

PREPOSITION
at term (medical)

Her baby was born at term.

PHRASES
in the long term, in the medium term, in the near term, in the short term

In the long term, our efforts will pay off.

a term of imprisonment, a term of office

The president was sworn in for his second term of office.

a term of years

The lease is granted for a set term of years.

{{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}}
verb be termed
ADVERB
aptly
accurately
broadly, loosely
commonly, generally, often
variously

This material is variously termed ash, clinker, cinders or slag.

collectively
euphemistically (esp. BrE)
hereafter (formal)

The sampling units (hereafter termed ‘local areas’) are towns.

PREPOSITION
as

His condition would be more accurately termed as ‘chronic fatigue’.


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:
, , , , , , / , , , , / (considered as having a definite meaning; particularly a technical word), , , / (of a syllogism, of an equation, of a fraction, of a proportion, etc.), , , , , , , , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Term — Term, n. [F. terme, L. termen, inis, terminus, a boundary limit, end; akin to Gr. ?, ?. See {Thrum} a tuft, and cf. {Terminus}, {Determine}, {Exterminate}.] 1. That which limits the extent of anything; limit; extremity; bound; boundary. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • term — n often attrib 1: a specified period of time the policy term 2: the whole period for which an estate is granted; also: the estate itself 3 a: the period in which the powers of a court may be validly exercised b …   Law dictionary

  • Term — may refer to: *Term (computers) or terminal emulator, a program that emulates a video terminal *Term (language) or terminology, a word or compound word used in a specific context *Term (mathematics), a component of a mathematical expression… …   Wikipedia

  • Term — Term, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Termed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Terming}.] [See {Term}, n., and cf. {Terminate}.] To apply a term to; to name; to call; to denominate. [1913 Webster] Men term what is beyond the limits of the universe imaginary space. Locke.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • term — ► NOUN 1) a word or phrase used to describe a thing or to express a concept. 2) (terms) language used on a particular occasion: a protest in the strongest possible terms. 3) (terms) stipulated or agreed requirements or conditions. 4) (terms)… …   English terms dictionary

  • term — term1 [tʉrm] n. [ME terme < OFr < L terminus, a limit, boundary, end < IE * termṇ, a boundary stake < base * ter , to cross over, go beyond > TRANS , Gr terma, goal] 1. Archaic a point of time designating the beginning or end of a… …   English World dictionary

  • term — [n1] description of a concept appellation, article, caption, denomination, designation, expression, head, indication, language, locution, moniker*, name, nomenclature, phrase, style, terminology, title, vocable, word; concepts 275,683 term [n2]… …   New thesaurus

  • term — (n.) early 13c., terme limit in time, set or appointed period, from O.Fr. terme limit of time or place (11c.), from L. terminus end, boundary line, related to termen boundary, end (see TERMINUS (Cf. terminus)). Sense of period of time during… …   Etymology dictionary

  • term|er — «TUR muhr», noun. a person who is serving a term as a public official: »a fourth termer …   Useful english dictionary

  • Term — der; s, e <aus gleichbed. fr. terme, eigtl. »Grenze, Begrenzung«, dies aus (m)lat. terminus, vgl. ↑Termin>: 1. [Reihe von] Zeichen in einer formalisierten Theorie, mit der od. dem eines der in der Theorie betrachteten Objekte dargestellt… …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • term — англ. [тэ/эм] terme фр. [тэрм] termine ит. [тэ/рминэ] Terminus нем. [тэрминус] термин …   Словарь иностранных музыкальных терминов