compromise


compromise
{{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}}
noun
ADJECTIVE
acceptable, fair, good, happy (esp. BrE), possible, pragmatic, reasonable, sensible, suitable
ideal
painful, uneasy, unsatisfactory

After months of negotiations, they have reached an uneasy compromise.

inevitable, necessary
political
historic
VERB + COMPROMISE
agree on, arrive at, come to, find, forge, make, reach, strike, work out

I'm not making any more compromises.

They're still trying to work out an acceptable compromise.

look for, seek

It is best to try to seek a compromise rather than a perfect solution.

broker, negotiate
offer, suggest

After much discussion, she offered a compromise.

accept
reject
COMPROMISE + NOUN
agreement, deal, formula, position, proposal, resolution, solution
bill, legislation (both AmE)
candidate

He might be an attractive compromise candidate if both sides' first choices are rejected.

PREPOSITION
compromise between

It was a fair compromise between the two sides.

compromise on, compromise over

They came to a compromise over the exact amount to be paid.

compromise with

There could be no compromise with the nationalists.

{{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}}
verb
1 in order to reach agreement
VERB + COMPROMISE
be prepared to, be ready to
refuse to

He wanted his own way and refused to compromise.

PREPOSITION
on

Unions and management seem ready to compromise on the level of the increase.

with

They debated whether to compromise with the opposition parties.

2 damage/put in danger
ADVERB
fatally, seriously, severely, significantly

The affair seriously compromised the party's prospects of success.

potentially
VERB + COMPROMISE
be prepared to, be ready to
refuse to
PREPOSITION
on

We are not prepared to compromise on safety standards.

Compromise is used with these nouns as the object: ↑chance, ↑confidentiality, ↑impartiality, ↑independence, ↑integrity, ↑principle, ↑quality, ↑safety, ↑security, ↑value

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • COMPROMISE — (Heb. פְּשָׁרָה, pesharah; apparently derived from the term pesher, solution, Eccles. 8:1), deciding a civil law dispute (dinei mamonot) by the court or an arbitral body, through the exercise of their discretion and not according to the laws… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • compromise — com·pro·mise 1 n: an agreement resolving differences by mutual concessions esp. to prevent or end a lawsuit compromise 2 vb mised, mis·ing vt: to resolve or dispose of by a compromise cases in which a dispute is compromised E. A. Farnsworth and W …   Law dictionary

  • Compromise — Com pro*mise, n. [F. compromis, fr. L. compromissum a mutual promise to abide by the decision of an arbiter, fr. compromittere to make such a promise; com + promittere to promise. See {Promise}.] 1. A mutual agreement to refer matters in dispute… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • compromise — [n] agreement, give and take accommodation, accord, adjustment, arrangement, bargain, compact, composition, concession, contract, copout*, covenant, deal, fifty fifty*, half and half, half measure, happy medium*, mean, middle course, middle… …   New thesaurus

  • compromise — [käm′prə mīz΄] n. [ME & OFr compromis < LL compromissum, a compromise, mutual promise < L compromissus, pp. of compromittere, to make a mutual promise to abide by an arbiter s decision < com , together + promittere, to PROMISE] 1. a… …   English World dictionary

  • Compromise — Com pro*mise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Compromised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Compromising}.] [From {Compromise}, n.; cf. {Compromit}.] 1. To bind by mutual agreement; to agree. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Laban and himself were compromised That all the eanlings… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Compromise — Com pro*mise, v. i. 1. To agree; to accord. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. To make concession for conciliation and peace. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • compromise — (n.) early 15c., a joint promise to abide by an arbiter s decision, from M.Fr. compromis (13c.), from L. compromissus, pp. of compromittere to make a mutual promise (to abide by an arbiter s decision), from com together (see COM (Cf. com )) +… …   Etymology dictionary

  • compromise — ► NOUN 1) an agreement reached by each side making concessions. 2) an intermediate state between conflicting opinions, reached by mutual concession. ► VERB 1) settle a dispute by mutual concession. 2) expediently accept standards that are lower… …   English terms dictionary

  • compromise — ▪ I. compromise com‧pro‧mise 1 [ˈkɒmprəmaɪz ǁ ˈkɑːm ] noun [countable, uncountable] an agreement between two people or groups in which both sides agree to accept less than they first asked for and to give up something that they value: •… …   Financial and business terms


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