intervene


intervene
verb
ADVERB
actively, directly
personally

The President intervened personally in the crisis.

decisively

Government often intervenes decisively in major professional issues in medicine.

effectively, successfully
forcefully, militarily

Intervening militarily will not bring peace.

tactfully
VERB + INTERVENE
be forced to, have to

Eventually, the army was forced to intervene.

be powerless to (esp. BrE)

Local people feel strongly about the proposed development but are virtually powerless to intervene.

be able to, have the ability to, have the power to, have the right to

Our government has no right to intervene.

be prepared to, be ready to

Nurses should be ready to intervene on behalf of their patients.

be reluctant to
refuse to

The UN refused to intervene.

PREPOSITION
against

They would not intervene against the rebels themselves.

between

She went over to intervene between the two men.

in

She was reluctant to intervene in what was essentially a private dispute.

on behalf of

The ambassador intervened personally on behalf of the children.

with

attempts to intervene with the authorities on the prisoners' behalf

Intervene is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑fate, ↑minister, ↑president

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • intervene — in·ter·vene /ˌin tər vēn/ vi ven·ed, ven·ing 1: to occur, fall, or come between points of time or events may be held liable even though other independent agencies intervene between his negligence and the ultimate result Hooks Superx Inc. v.… …   Law dictionary

  • intervene — in‧ter‧vene [ˌɪntəˈviːn ǁ tər ] verb [intransitive] to become involved in a situation in order to help deal with a problem: • The Federal Reserve Bank had to intervene to support the dollar (= buy the currency to keep it from falling ) .… …   Financial and business terms

  • Intervene — In ter*vene , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Intervened}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Intervening}.] [L. intervenire, interventum, to intervene, to hinder; inter between + venire to come; akin to E. come: cf. F. intervenir. See {Come}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To come… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intervene — (v.) 1580s, back formation from intervention, or else from L. intervenire to come between, intervene, interrupt, from inter between (see INTER (Cf. inter )) + venire to come (see VENUE (Cf. venue)). Related: Intervened; intervening …   Etymology dictionary

  • intervene — [v1] mediate arbitrate, barge in, butt in*, come between, divide, horn in*, intercede, interfere, intermediate, interpose, interrupt, intrude, involve, meddle, mix in, muscle in*, negotiate, obtrude, part, put in two cents*, reconcile, separate,… …   New thesaurus

  • Intervene — In ter*vene , v. t. To come between. [R.] [1913 Webster] Self sown woodlands of birch, alder, etc., intervening the different estates. De Quincey. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Intervene — In ter*vene , n. A coming between; intervention; meeting. [Obs.] Sir H. Wotton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intervene — *interpose, mediate, intercede, interfere Analogous words: *separate, part, divide, sever: *intrude, interlope, butt in, obtrude …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • intervene — ► VERB 1) come between so as to prevent or alter the result or course of events. 2) (usu. as adj. intervening) occur or be between or among. DERIVATIVES intervener (also intervenor) noun. ORIGIN Latin intervenire come between …   English terms dictionary

  • intervene — [in΄tər vēn′] vi. intervened, intervening [L intervenire < inter , between + venire, to COME] 1. to come, be, or lie between 2. to take place between two events, points of time, etc. 3. to come or be in between as something unnecessary or… …   English World dictionary